post

Using the Power of the Written Word to Raise your Energy and Uplift Others!

The written word can be very powerful when it comes to raising our energy and inspiring/uplifting others. We can be uplifted by a book we read, by an inspiring quote, or a mere word we see written on the side of a building. I know that seeing the word “Love” written on buildings, t-shirts, buttons, menus, or any other place, almost always seems to lift my energy and make me smile.

Knowing the powerful effect of words, I write positive words and phrases around my home to keep the energy high and to keep me inspired. I post positive statements such as “Today is a beautiful day” on the bathroom mirror with dry-erase marker, or we write a list of goals/dreams I’m working on to keep us focused and inspired. Current messages on the fridge include: “Life is Good,” and “Love yourself. Love others. Love the world.” Friends, clients, and members from my Meetup groups frequently comment on the “positive energy” in my home and say how they love all of the “inspiring and uplifting messages around.”

One of the things I love to do is write/design positive messages on small pieces of paper and give them out to “strangers.” I regularly go out into the community with other members from my meetup group (Southern Maine Random Acts of Kindness) and hand out these messages to passersby. Our messages say things like, “You are Loved,” “You are a beautiful expression of life,” or “Who’s the most awesome person today? You!”

Every step of this process is very powerful: The writing of the messages makes me feel good, because I’m writing positive, high energy words and phrases which is basically downloaded into my brain. The handing out of messages feels great as well, as most people who are given one of our messages smile or express their appreciation in some way. Some people are so touched they tear up, give us a hug, stick around to chat with us about our mission, and/or join our group!

This much is clear to me: the written word can uplift, inspire, and make the heart happy. It’s one of the easiest, most accessible tools I know of, and it can do great good in your own life and in the lives of others. A friend of mine was known at his last job as the “positive post-it guy,” as he would leave little sticky notes on people’s desks with positive messages. Likewise, a simple thank you card or a letter telling someone how you feel about them can have very positive and powerful effects.

Like everything else, words have energy; the more positive the word, the higher the energy it carries, and thus the greater the positive effect it can have on you and others. As an experiment, get out a piece of paper and write letters A-Z down the page with A on the top line, B on the second line down, and so on. Start with the letter A and write down the most positive/high energy word you can think of. Do this all the way through Z (you can use creative freedom for the tricky letters; i.e. instead of coming up with a word that begins with “X” you could write the word “eXpress.” After you are done writing a word for each letter, read through the list and feel the essence of the word you wrote down. If you wrote “Beauty” for B, feel the essence of Beauty inside your body. After you are done going through the list, take note of how you are feeling. How does your body feel? Your mind? What is your mood like?

Lifting your spirits or helping yourself get back on a more positive frame of mind can be as simple as thinking of/meditating on some positive words. Words have the power to either bring us down or lift us up. Assuming you prefer the latter, why not make use of this simple and wonderful tool today by surrounding yourself with positive statements and passing positive words onto others?

In love,

Robyn <3

post

What Message Are You Sending To Your Kids?

My friend Elise was sitting with her 6 and 3 year old boys after dinner when her phone beeped. She picked up her phone, saw that a new work email had arrived, and read the message. It wasn’t urgent, or important, or interesting, but she felt compelled to take care of her co-worker’s request.

James, her youngest son asked, “Who’s that, momma?”  She didn’t answer, just kept typing away.

Then her older son, Ben, said to James, “Leave her alone, J. Mom has really important things to take care of, more important than us.”

Ben’s words struck Elise hard. She realized she was addicted to her devices. She was putting trivial work tasks ahead of her family. And they were starting to notice.

When a parent frequently interrupts family time to get on his or her mobile device, it sends a message to the kids that the person or email on the other end matters more than they do. With younger kids, it causes them to feel lonely, sad and neglected. With older kids, it makes those parents who try to control kids’ use of cell phones look like hypocrites.

Today, your ThinkGood Call-to-Action is to set aside certain hours every week as Unplugged Family Time.

It only needs to be an hour or two a day, it can be during meals or while in the car. But make it a point to ignore those beeps and be in the moment with your family. After you’ve done this a couple of times, come back here and tell us what difference you’ve seen in those family members who now have your attention.

(Photo by PatCastaldo on Flickr)

post

The Power of a Smile

A few weeks ago, I was having a group of teens I work with write and decorate positive messages to hand out to strangers. My favorite message that one of the male teens came up with was, “A Smile Can Change a Life.”

How right on he was. Of course, I’ve believed in the power of smiling at strangers, loved ones, or just smiling when no one is looking, for quite some time. I’d think to myself that smiling at the construction worker as I drove by or smiling at someone I walk past on the street could elicit a smile back, thus uplifting them and their mood. But I didn’t really think of it in terms of changing their lives…

But when you really think about it, a smile really does have the power to change a life. It could be your smile at that man walking down the street that triggers something in him to make a change in his life. Maybe your smile helped to break down a wall he’d had in his heart, maybe it motivated him to finally get out there and meet some new people, maybe it showed him that other people do care and that there’s no benefit to seeing the world as a hostile, unfriendly place.

I know that when somebody smiles at me, I can’t help but feel uplifted.. especially if it’s from a stranger or unexpected. This feeling can last for several minutes or hours and it seems to always raise the tone of my day.

You may feel sometimes like you have little time, energy, or resources to give back to other people or the world at large, but you always have your smile. It takes no extra time to smile at the person walking towards you, it costs nothing to flash a smile at the bank teller. It may require energy in that you may have to remind yourself to do it and go through with it, but most likely you will be energized by the interaction and feel yourself lifted. In fact, research shows, the more you smile at and do acts of kindness for others, the more energized, happy, and fulfilled you feel. Not a bad payoff!

No matter where you are in life, you can always make positive difference in the world. It can be as grand as building a house for a family in need or as simple as smiling. So flash those pearly whites, (or gums if you have no teeth), and change some lives! You can bet that your life will be changed as well. =-D

In love,
Robyn <3

post

10 Facts That Prove Helping Others Is A Key To Achieving Happiness

You’ve heard us talk about the cycle of good….Think Good, Do Good, Feel Good, right?  Well this Huffington Post article gives 10 great examples of how thinking and doing good lead to happiness, and we all want more happiness.  Read on.

1. Helping Others Will Actually Make You Feel Great

Giving back has an effect on your body. Studies show that when people donated to charity, the mesolimbic system, the portion of the brain responsible for feelings of reward, was triggered. The brain also releases feel-good chemicals and spurs you to perform more kind acts — something psychologists call “helper’s high.”

2. Giving Can Give You A Self-Esteem Boost

Heard enough from your inner critic? Consider donating some of your time to a cause you’re passionate about. People who volunteer have been found to have higher self-esteem and overall well-being. Experts explain that as feelings of social connectedness increase, so does your self-esteem. The benefits of volunteering also depend on your consistency. So, the more regularly you volunteer, the more confidence you’ll be able to cultivate.

3. You’ll Have Stronger Friendships

Being a force for good in a friend’s life can help build a lasting bond. When you help others, you give off positive vibes, which can rub off on your peers and improve your friendships, according to a study by the National Institutes of Health. Both parties will contribute to maintaining a mutually beneficial dynamic.

4. You Become A Glass Half-Full Type Person

Having a positive impact on someone else could help you change your own outlook and attitude. Experts say that performing acts of kindness boosts your mood and ultimately makes you more optimistic and positive.

5. Helping Others Will Make You Feel Like You Can Take On The World

Helping someone out can leave you feeling rewarded and fulfilled. People who participate in volunteer work feel more empowered than those who do not. According to a survey by the United Health Group, 96 percent of people who volunteered over the last 12 months said volunteering enriches their sense of purpose.

6. You’ll Feel A Sense Of Belonging

Whether with a large group of people in a volunteer organization, or just between two friends exchanging words of advice, helping people creates a feeling of community. “Face-to-face activities such as volunteering at a drop-in center can help reduce loneliness and isolation,” according to the Mental Health Foundation.

7. Giving Will Help You Find Your Inner Peace

If you have a lot that’s wearing you down, giving back could help clear your head. In a study by United Health Group, 78 percent of people who volunteered over a 12-month period said they felt that their charitable activities lowered their stress. They were also more calm and peaceful than people who didn’t participate in volunteer work.

8. It Will Make You Feel Thankful

Helping others gives you perspective on your own situation, and teaches you to be appreciative of what you have. The Global One Foundation describes volunteering as a way to “promote a deeper sense of gratitude as we recognize more of what is already a blessing/gift/positive in our life.”

9. It Gives You A Sense Of Renewal

Helping others can teach you to help yourself. If you’ve been through a tough experience or just have a case of the blues, the “activism cure” is a great way get back to feeling like yourself, according to research from the University of Texas. “Volunteer work improves access to social and psychological resources, which are known to counter negative moods,” the study read.

10. Finally, Helping Others Will Spur Others To Pay It Forward And Keep The Cycle Of Happiness Going

Kindness is contagious, according to a study by researchers at University of California, Los Angeles, and University of Cambridge and University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom. “When we see someone else help another person it gives us a good feeling,” the study states, “Which in turn causes us to go out and do something altruistic ourselves.”

post

One Kind Word Can Change Someone’s Entire Day

Think about a day when you’ve been kinda down, a lot on your mind, or under pressure at work. And someone gave you a kind word that snapped you out of it, and gave you a fresh outlook on the day.

Your mission today is to seek out someone who looks like they could use a boost, and say something kind to them. Then come back and tell us the reaction you saw in their face.